Similar to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), Beijing will set-up an “International Maritime Judicial Center.” In order to help protect every countries sea rights, Chief justice Zhou Qiang said.

This Chinese judicial center will primarily focus on the case of countries with territorial sea issues with China.

Zhou Qiang, President of China's Supreme People's Court, gives a speech during the third plenary session of the National People's Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People, in Beijing, China, March 13, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-hoon - RTX28W8K
Zhou Qiang, President of China’s Supreme People’s Court, gives a speech during the third plenary session of the National People’s Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People, in Beijing, China, March 13, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-hoon –

China’s Chief justice Zhou Qiang said that the Countries International Maritime Judicial Center is likewise similar to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), that also defines the rights and responsibilities of nations with respect to their use of the world’s oceans, establishing guidelines for businesses, the environment, and the management of marine natural resources.

As quoted by Xinhua, Zhou Qiang said “We must resolutely safeguard China’s national sovereignty, maritime rights, and other core interests. We must improve the work of maritime courts and build an international maritime judicial center.”

An official from Xinhua news agency reported that courts across the country are working to implement a national strategy of turning the country into a “maritime power.”

China’s Naval, Maritime Power

The move comes ahead of a highly anticipated ruling later this year by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on the Philippines’ dispute with China over the South China Sea. China has not participated in the case and said it will ignore the ruling.

A rights analysts of International Law in the Maritime studies said, using this strategy, Beijing could use to bolster its claims in the disputed South and East China seas. – Jason E.

SHARE

NO COMMENTS